Battle of Prairie Grove: Confederate Order of Battle

Thomas' Legion
American Civil War HOMEPAGE
American Civil War
American Civil War Websites
Causes of the Civil War : What Caused the Civil War
Organization of Union and Confederate Armies: Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery
Civil War Navy: Union Navy and Confederate Navy
American Civil War: The Soldier's Life
Civil War Turning Points
American Civil War: Casualties, Battles and Battlefields
Civil War Casualties, Fatalities & Statistics
Civil War Generals
American Civil War Desertion and Deserters: Union and Confederate
Civil War Prisoner of War: Union and Confederate Prison History
Civil War Reconstruction Era and Aftermath
American Civil War Genealogy and Research
Civil War
American Civil War Pictures - Photographs
African Americans and American Civil War History
American Civil War Store
American Civil War Polls
NORTH CAROLINA HISTORY
North Carolina Civil War History
North Carolina American Civil War Statistics, Battles, History
North Carolina Civil War History and Battles
North Carolina Civil War Regiments and Battles
North Carolina Coast: American Civil War
HISTORY OF WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA
Western North Carolina and the American Civil War
Western North Carolina: Civil War Troops, Regiments, Units
North Carolina: American Civil War Photos
Cherokee Chief William Holland Thomas
HISTORY OF THE CHEROKEE INDIANS
Cherokee Indian Heritage, History, Culture, Customs, Ceremonies, and Religion
Cherokee Indians: American Civil War
History of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indian Nation
Cherokee War Rituals, Culture, Festivals, Government, and Beliefs
Researching your Cherokee Heritage
Civil War Diary, Memoirs, Letters, and Newspapers
American Civil War Store: Books, DVDs, etc.

Battle of Prairie Grove: Confederate Order of Battle

I Corps, Confederate Trans-Mississippi Army
Major General Thomas C. Hindman (commanding 11,059 men on the battlefield)

First Division: Brigadier General John S. Roane (commanding 2132 men on the battlefield)
1st Brigade: Colonel Stand Watie (guarding Confederate supply train at Evansville)

Mounted Cherokee Rifles (guarding Confederate supply train at Evansville)
Mounted Creek Rifles (guarding Confederate Supply train at Evansville)
Osage, Choctaw, Seminole, Chickasaw and Comanche Indian Companies (guarding Confederate supply train at Evansville)
2nd Brigade: Brigadier General John S. Roane (commanding 2132 men on the battlefield)
20th Texas Cavalry (dismounted) - Colonel Thomas C. Bass (228 men)
22nd Texas Cavalry (dismounted) - Major Robert D. Stone (429 men)
31st Texas Cavalry (dismounted) - Lt. Colonel George W. Guess (284 men)
34th Texas Cavalry (dismounted) - Colonel A. M. Alexander (491 men)
9th Missouri Infantry - Colonel John B. Clark (564 men)
Reid's Arkansas Battery - Captain John G. Reid (37 men, two 6 pound smooth bore cannon)
Shoup's Arkansas Battery - Captain James C. Shoup (98 men, three mountain howitzers, two 25 pound mountain howitzers)

Second Division: Brigadier General Francis A. Shoup (commanding 3219 men on the battlefield)
1st Brigade: Brigadier General James F. Fagan (commanding 1555 men on the battlefield)

Hawthorn's Arkansas Infantry - Colonel Alexander T. Hawthorn (291 men)
22nd (35th) Arkansas Infantry - Colonel James P. King (400 men)
29th (37th) Arkansas Infantry - Colonel Joseph C. Pleasants (304 men)
34th Arkansas Infantry - Colonel William H. Brooks (400 men)
Chew's Arkansas Infantry Battalion - Major Rober E. Chew (115 men)
Blocher's Arkansas Battery - Captain William D. Blocher (45 men, two 6 pound smooth bore cannon, two 12 pound field howitzers)
2nd Brigade: Brigadier General Dandrdge McRae (commanding 1664 men on the battlefield)

26th Arkansas Infantry - Colonel Asa S. Morgan (412 men)
28th (36th) Arkansas Infantry - Lt. Colonel John E. Glenn (497 men)
30th (39th) Arkansas Infantry - Colonel Archibald J. McNeill (304 men)
32nd Arkansas Infantry - Lt. Colonel Charles L. Young (370 men)
Marshall's Arkansas Battery - Captain John G. Marshall (78 men, two 6 pound smooth bore cannon, two 12 pound field howitzers)

Third Division: Brigadier General Daniel M. Frost (commanding 3926 men on the battlefield)
1st Brigade: Brigadier General Mosby M. Parsons (commanding 3111 men on the battlefield)

Mitchell's Missouri Infantry - Lt. Colonel Charles S. Mitchell (440 men)
7th Missouri Infantry - Colonel Josiah H. Caldwell (754 men)
8th Missouri Infantry - Colonel Dewitt C. Hunter (684 men)
9th Missouri Infantry - Lt. Colonel Willis M. Ponder (476 men)
10th Missouri Infantry - Colonel Alexander E. Steen (560 men)
9th Missouri Sharpshooters - Major Lebbeus A. Pindall (123 men)
Tilden's Missouri battery - Captain Charles B. Tilden (74 men, two 6 pound smooth bore cannon, two 12 pound field howitzers)
2nd Brigade: Colonel Robert G. Shaver (commanding 815 men on the battlefield)

Adams' Arkansas Infantry - Colonel Charles W. Adams (305 men)
27th Arkansas Infantry - Colonel James R. Shaler (stationed at Ft. Smith, Arkansas)
33rd Arkansas Infantry - Colonel Hiram L. Grinstead (306 men)
38th Arkansas Infantry Battalion - Lt. Colonel William C. Adams (140 men)
Roberts' Missouri Battery - Captain Westley Roberts (64 men, two 14 pound James cannon, two six pound smooth bore cannon)

Fourth Division (Cavalry): Brigadier General John S. Marmaduke (commanding 1782 men on the battlefield)
1st Brigade: Colonel James C. Monroe (commanding 500 men on the battlefield)
Carroll's Arkansas Cavalry - Lt. Colonel Lee. L. Thomson (225 men)
Monroe's Arkansas Cavalry - Major A. N. Johnson (225 men)
2nd Brigade: Colonel Joseph O. Shelby (Shelby's Raiders) (commanding 1475 men on the battlefield)

4th Missouri Cavalry - Colonel Beal G. Jeans (334 men)
5th Missouri Cavalry - Colonel Benjamin F. Gordon (338 men)
6th Missouri Cavalry - Colonel Gideon W. Thompson (333 men)
Elliot's Missouri Cavalry battalion - Captain Benjamin Elliott (101 men)

Quantrill's Company - Lt. William Gregg (33 men) (Included Frank and Jesse James)
Bledsoe's Missouri Battery - Captain Joseph Bledsoe (36 men, two six pound smooth bore cannon)
3rd Brigade: Colonel Emmett MacDonald (commanding 807 men on the battlefield)

MacDonald's Missouri Cavalry - Lt. Colonel Merrit L. Young (202 men)
Crump's Texas Cavalry - Lt. Colonel R. Phillip Crump (544 men)
West's Arkansas Battery - Captain Henry C. West (61 men, one 6 pound smooth bore cannon, two 12 pound field howitzers)

Source: Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies

Recommended Reading: Wilson's Creek, Pea Ridge, and Prairie Grove: A Battlefield Guide, with a Section on Wire Road (This Hallowed Ground: Guides to Civil War). Description: Wilson’s Creek, Pea Ridge, and Prairie Grove were three of the most important battles fought west of the Mississippi River during the Civil War. They influenced the course of the first half of the war in that region by shaping Union military efforts while significantly contributing to Confederate defeat. Wilson’s Creek, Pea Ridge, and Prairie Grove, the first book to provide a detailed guide to these battlefields, takes the visitor step-by-step through the major sites of each engagement. Continued below...

With numerous maps and illustrations that enhance the authors’ descriptions of what happened at each stop, the book also includes analytical accounts explaining tactical problems associated with each battle as well as vignettes evoking for readers the personal experience of those who fought there. An indispensable companion for the battlefield visitor, this guide offers not only touring information and driving tours of sites associated with the campaigns that led to the battles, but also a brief history of each battle and an overview of the larger strategy and tactics of the military action in which these battles figured.

Site search Web search

NEW! Recommended Reading: Fields of Blood: The Prairie Grove Campaign (Civil War America) (Hardcover). Description: On Sunday, December 7, 1862, two armies collided at an obscure Arkansas hamlet named Prairie Grove in a desperate battle that effectively ended Confederate offensive operations west of the Mississippi River. In Fields of Blood, historian William L. Shea offers a gripping narrative of the events surrounding Prairie Grove, one of the great unsung battles of the Civil War. Continued below…

Shea provides a colorful account of a grueling campaign that lasted five months and covered hundreds of miles of rugged Ozark terrain. In a fascinating analysis of the personal, geographical, and strategic elements that led to the fateful clash in northwest Arkansas, he describes a campaign notable for rapid marching, bold movements, hard fighting, and the most remarkable raid of the Civil War. After months of intricate maneuvering punctuated by five battles in three states, armies led by Thomas C. Hindman and James G. Blunt met one last time at Prairie Grove. The costly daylong struggle was a tactical draw but a key strategic victory for the Union, as the Confederates never again seriously attempted to recover Missouri or threaten Kansas. Historians have long ignored the complex campaign that ended in such spectacular fashion at Prairie Grove, but it is at last brought to life in these pages. From the Inside Flap: Shea offers a gripping narrative of the events surrounding Prairie Grove, Arkansas, one of the great unsung battles of the Civil War that effectively ended Confederate offensive operations west of the Mississippi River. Shea provides a colorful account of a grueling campaign that lasted five months and covered hundreds of miles of rugged Ozark terrain. In a fascinating analysis of the personal, geographical, and strategic elements that led to the fateful clash in northwest Arkansas, he describes a campaign notable for rapid marching, bold movements, hard fighting, and the most remarkable raid of the Civil War. About the Author: William L. Shea is professor of history at the University of Arkansas at Monticello. He is coauthor of several books, including Pea Ridge: Civil War Campaign in the West (UNC Press) and Vicksburg Is the Key: The Struggle for the Mississippi River.

 

Recommended Reading: Pea Ridge: Civil War Campaign in the West. Description from Publishers Weekly: With its exhaustive research and lively prose style, this military study is virtually a model work of its kind. Shea and Hess, who teach history at the University of Arkansas at Monticello and Lincoln Memorial University (Tenn.), respectively, convincingly argue that the 1862 campaign for Pea Ridge (Ark.) decisively changed the balance of power in the West, with the Union gaining effective control of Missouri. Samuel Curtis, commander of the Federal Army of the Southwest, understood the strategic requirements of his theater, according to the authors, and elicited the best performance from his troops, even though they were beset by internal tensions. Continued below...

The Southern commander, Earl van Dorn, the authors maintain, was a swashbuckler out of his depth--particularly in light of the administrative weaknesses of the trans-Mississippi Confederacy. Their detailed analysis of the climactic battle impressively conveys the difficulties of the improvised armies that groped for and grappled with each other in the Civil War West. From Library Journal: The battle of Pea Ridge, fought in northwestern Arkansas in March 1862, was probably the most important trans-Mississippi battle of the Civil War. It was unusual in the use of Indian troops and in the Confederates' numerical superiority, better supplies, and inferior leadership. The battle ended any serious Confederate threat to Missouri and opened the Union's path into Arkansas. The book offers the rich tactical detail, maps, and order of battle that military scholars love but retains a very readable style combined with liberal use of recollections of the troops and leaders involved…  This is an important book for academic libraries and for public libraries in the region.

 

Recommended Reading: Pea Ridge And Prairie Grove, Or Incidents Of The War In Arkansas. Description: With the goal of sketching "at least some of the bright lights and dark shadows of the war, " William Baxter authored his regional classic, Pea Ridge and Prairie Grove, in 1864, before the actual end of the Civil War. Primarily focusing on the civilians of the region, Baxter vividly describes their precarious and vulnerable positions during the advances and retreats of armies as Confederate and Federal forces marched across their homeland. In his account, Baxter describes skirmishes and cavalry charges outside his front door, the "firing" of his town's buildings during a Confederate retreat, dashes between secessionist and Unionist neighbors, the feeding of hungry soldiers and the forceful appropriation of his remaining food supply, and the sickening sight of the wounded emerging from the Prairie Grove battlefield. Continued below…

Since its original printing, this firsthand account has only been reprinted once, in 1957, and both editions are considered collectors' items today. Of interest to Civil War scholars and general readers alike, Baxter's compelling social history is rendered even more comprehensive by William Shea's introduction. Pea Ridge and Prairie Grove is a valuable personal account of the Civil War in the Trans-Mississippi West which enables us to better comprehend the conflict as a whole and its devastating affect on the general populace of the war-torn portions of the country.

 

Recommended Reading: The Flags Of Civil War Arkansas, by Glenn Dedmondt. Description: From the end of 1860 through the spring of 1861, representatives from throughout Arkansas gathered to discuss the option of secession. The question had been put to the legislators multiple times, but Unionist tendencies prevailed in Arkansas, and the state was not among the first to secede. On May 6, 1861, however, the representatives of the "Nary One" state met and decided that Arkansas belonged with her Southern brothers and voted 69 to 1 to dissolve their ties with the federal government. Throughout the course of the Civil War, Arkansas furnished sixty-five thousand men to serve in defense of the South, and each of the companies and regiments proudly bore a banner to represent their cause. In this painstakingly researched study of Arkansas Civil War-era flags, the author presents a stunning history of the Civil War in Arkansas as told through the state's company, battle, and regiment flags. Included are the Bonnie Blue Flag, the First National Flag of the Confederate States, and dozens of Arkansas Infantry and Cavalry regiment and battalion flags, along with a concise text about the history of each unit and flag itself.. Continued below…

From the Back Cover: Praise for Glenn Dedmondt's previous books: "A meticulously detailed resource offering very specific information for history and Civil War buffs, The Flags of Civil War North Carolina, is a welcome contribution to the growing library of Civil War studies and could very well serve as a template for similar volumes." --The Midwest Book Review. "A good effort that serves to explain the flags these men fought for." --Blue & Gray Magazine. "Colorful and well illustrated, and contains much information about each flag." --The Civil War News.

On May 6, 1861, representatives from Arkansas voted to dissolve their ties with the government in Washington, D.C., feeling that Arkansas belonged with her Southern brothers. Arkansas furnished 65,000 men to serve in defense of the South, nearly its entire male population. The flags in this work are the symbols of the sacrifices and strengths of these men from the Land of Opportunity. Despite the large number of companies outfitted in Arkansas, surprisingly few of their flags survive. As a result of detailed research into archived newspapers and other contemporaneous accounts, the author provides here, for the first time, a nearly exhaustive study of the flags and the men who proudly carried them. From the Bonnie Blue Flag, the unofficial state flag of secession in Arkansas, to the First National flag of the Confederate States and the numerous other company and regimental flags the men of Arkansas bore into battle, each banner is presented in full color, accompanied by a history of its unit and creation. Other books in this series include The Flags of the Confederacy: An Illustrated History, The Flags of the Union: An Illustrated History, Flags of Louisiana, Flags of Tennessee, and Flags of Texas, all published by Pelican.

 

Recommended Reading: Arkansas, 1800-1860: Remote and Restless (Histories of Arkansas). Description: Often thought of as a primitive backwoods peopled by rough hunters and unsavory characters, early Arkansas was actually productive and dynamic in the same manner as other American territories and states. In this, the second volume in the Histories of Arkansas, S. Charles Bolton describes the migration, mostly from other southern states, that carried Americans into Arkansas; the growth of an agricultural economy based on cotton, corn, and pork; the dominance of evangelical religion; and the way in which women coped with the frontier and made their own contributions toward its improvement. Continued below…

He closely compares the actual lifestyles of the settlers with the popularly held, uncomplimentary image. Separate chapters deal with slavery and the lives of the slaves and with Indian affairs, particularly the dispossession of the native Quapaws and the late-coming Cherokees. Political chapters explore opportunism in Arkansas Territory, the rise of the Democratic Party under the control of the Sevier-Johnson group known as the "Dynasty, " and the forces that led Arkansas to secede from the Union. In addition, Arkansas's role in the Mexican War and the California gold rush is treated in detail. In truth, geographic isolation and a rugged terrain did keep Arkansas under-populated, and political violence and a disastrous experience in state banking tarnished its reputation, but the state still developed rapidly and successfully in this period, playing an important role on the southwestern frontier.

 

Recommended Reading: With Fire and Sword: Arkansas, 1861-1874 (Histories of Arkansas). Description: Thoughtfully written by Thomas A. DeBlack (Associate Professor of History, Arkansas Tech University), With Fire And Sword: Arkansas, 1861-1874 provides a scholarly examination of just how the events of the Civil War and the Reconstruction so heavily devastated the state of Arkansas, its population and its economy, that this southern state was never to fully regained the level of prosperity it had enjoyed prior to the war. A candid and detailed retracing of crucial decisions, their interplay, and their lasting legacy, With Fire And Sword is a welcome contribution to the growing library of Civil War literature and Reconstruction Era reference collections and reading lists.

Return to American Civil War Homepage

Return to top

Best viewed with Microsoft Internet Explorer or Google Chrome.

Site Meter