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North Carolina Census Records

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Recommended Reading: Map Guide to the U.S. Federal Censuses, 1790-1920. Description: The county has always been used as the basic Federal census unit. Genealogical research in the census, therefore, begins with identifying the correct county jurisdictions. This work shows all U.S. county boundaries from 1790 to 1920. On each of the nearly 400 maps the old county lines are superimposed over the modern ones to highlight the boundary changes at ten-year intervals. Also included are (1) a history of census growth; (2) the technical facts about each census; (3) a discussion of census accuracy; (4) an essay on available sources for each state's old county lines; and (5) a statement with each map indicating which county census lines exist and which are lost. Then there is an index listing all present-day counties, plus nearly all defunct counties or counties later renamed. Continued below...
With each map there is data on boundary changes, notes about the census, and locality finding keys. There also are inset maps that clarify territorial lines, a state-by-state bibliography of sources, and an appendix outlining pitfalls in mapping county boundaries. The detail in this work is exhaustive and of such impeccable standards that there is little wonder why this award-winning publication is the number one tool in U.S. census research.

 

Recommended Reading: Ancestry's Red Book: American State, County & Town Sources, Third Revised Edition [ILLUSTRATED] (Hardcover) (900 pages). Description: No scholarly reference library is complete without a copy of Ancestry's Red Book. In it, you will find both general and specific information essential to researchers of American records. This revised 3rd edition provides updated county and town listings within the same overall state-by-state organization. Whether you are looking for your ancestors in the northeastern states, the South, the West, or somewhere in the middle, Ancestry's Red Book has information on records and holdings for every county in the United States, as well as excellent maps from renowned mapmaker William Dollarhide. Continued below…

In short, the 900 page Red Book is simply the book that no genealogist can afford not to have. The availability of census records such as federal, state, county, city, town, and territorial census reports is covered in detail. Vital records are also discussed, including when and where they were kept and how. Organized by state, Ancestry's Red Book helps you find information-rich resources for all kinds of records all across America.

 

Recommended Reading: The Family Tree Problem Solver: Proven Methods for Scaling the Inevitable Brick Wall. Description: Complications arising from incomplete or missing records, census irregularities and individuals of the same name occur more often than non-genealogists might think. The author, a respected genealogist, helps intermediate to advanced researchers break through these "brick walls" by breaking down each researcher's common problem into a chapter with straightforward solutions. Continued below...

Readers will: Go straight to the answers they need without wading through theory or irrelevant records overviews; Find explanations and case studies easily understood and useful for intermediate or advanced genealogists; Learn what NOT to do in research to avoid hitting brick walls in the future. The result is the best and most accessible book on the market about overcoming obstacles, from Family Tree Magazine and Family Tree Books, the sources of genealogy's most popular publications.

 

Recommended Reading: Genealogy 101: How to Trace Your Family's History and Heritage. Description: A recent Maritz Poll reported that 60% of Americans are interested in their family history. And with good reason. Through genealogy, you can go back into history to meet people who have had more influence on your life than any others -- your ancestors. And the better you get to know your ancestors, the better you will get to know yourself: the who's and what's and why's of you. Barbara Renick, a nationally-known lecturer on genealogy, tells the uninitiated researcher the steps needed to find out who their ancestors really were, and brings together for even the more experienced genealogical researchers the important principles and practices. Continued below...

She covers such topics as the importance of staying organized and how to go about it; where and how to look for information in libraries, historical societies, and on the internet; recognizing that just because something is in print doesn't mean it's right; and how to prepare to visit the home where your ancestors lived. Genealogy 101 is the first book to read when you want to discover who your ancestors were, where they lived, and what they did.

 

Recommended Reading: The Complete Idiot's Guide to Genealogy, 2nd Edition. Description: A very helpful genealogy reference! It is extremely helpful if you're in the "I want to trace my roots, ancestors, family tree and heritage. How do I begin, where do I start, and how do I go about doing it?" situation. It contains numerous helpful common sense tips that will prevent future headaches and a lot of well thought out suggestions and tips too. One helpful hint: "Talk with your extended family and interview them for genealogy information, be patient with them, and let them tell their stories....document everything." Continued below...

There are plenty of well-mannered tips like these that elevate this book to excellence. A lot of the confusing aspects of genealogical research such as document requests and providing proof and evidence are well covered. RATED 5 STARS. Customer's Review: I bought this book when I hadn't yet done any research at all about my family history. A year and a half later, I have a file drawer full of information, and I have needed no other reference. I also bought a book called "The Source", which is supposed to be the 'genealogist's bible', and it has been a giant paperweight in comparison. Idiot's genealogy is full of the kind of practical information that can carry you through years of research. Happy hunting!!!

 

Recommended Reading: Trace Your Roots with DNA: Using Genetic Tests to Explore Your Family Tree. Description: Written by two of the country's top genealogists, this authoritative book is the first to explain how new and groundbreaking genetic testing can help you research your ancestry. According to American Demographics, 113 million Americans have begun to trace their roots, making genealogy the second most popular hobby in the country (after gardening). Enthusiasts clamor for new information from dozens of subscription-based websites, email newsletters, and magazines devoted to the subject. For these eager roots-seekers looking to take their searches to the next level, DNA testing is the answer. Continued below...

After a brief introduction to genealogy and genetics fundamentals, the authors explain the types of available testing, what kind of information the tests can provide, how to interpret the results, and how the tests work (it doesn't involve digging up your dead relatives). It's in expensive, easy to do, and the results are accurate: It's as simple as swabbing the inside of your cheek and popping a sample in the mail. Family lore has it that a branch of our family emigrated to Argentina and now I've found some people there with our name. Can testing tell us whether we're from the same family? My mother was adopted and doesn't know her ethnicity. Are there any tests available to help her learn about her heritage? I just discovered someone else with my highly unusual surname. How can we find out if we have a common ancestor? These are just a few of the types of genealogical scenarios readers can pursue. The authors reveal exactly what is possible-and what is not possible-with genetic testing. They include case studies of both famous historical mysteries and examples of ordinary folks whose exploration of genetic genealogy has enabled them to trace their roots.

 

Recommended Reading: A Family Affair: How to Plan and Direct the Best Family Reunion Ever (National Genealogical Society Guides) (National Genealogical Society Guides) Description: Stop looking for family reunion books - you have found it! This is the most comprehensive, easy to use, wonderful resource for planning family reunions - large and small. Ms. Clunies has done all the work for you - and made it a great read!!!

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