Temperance Calvert Thomas

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Temperance Calvert Thomas*
(1774-1874)

Temperance Calvert Thomas.jpg

Photographed by the Writer
Temperance Calvert Thomas* 1774-1874
She married Richard Thomas on May 6, 1804. Temperance Calvert was the grand-niece of Lord Baltimore, the Founder of Maryland, and she lived to the age of 100.

Temperance Calvert Thomas.jpg

Photographed by the Writer

Richard Thomas accidentally drowned in late 1804.

Temperance remained a widow and raised her only son William H. Thomas.

*Temperance Calvert Thomas is interred at Green Hill Cemetery, Waynesville, North Carolina, but her marker, however, incorrectly indicates 1805 as the death of her husband, Richard Thomas (Richard died in late 1804 and while Temperance was pregnant). Although Temperance was initially interred at Stekoa Fields, N.C., on October 1, 1874, and her daughter-in-law, Sarah Love Thomas, was interred adjacent to her on May 15, 1877, after the summer of 1893, both Temperance and Sarah were reinterred at Green Hill Cemetery and adjacent to William Holland Thomas. The present inter and new marker, consequently, reflect the inscription error of 1805.

Perhaps Richard’s incorrect death date on the present marker was committed intentionally. A death prior to 1805, the year that her son was born, could easily give the impression that Temperance had her son out of wedlock and immediately following the death of Richard – acts considered highly immoral at the time.

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Editor's Recommended Reading: Western North Carolina: A History from 1730 to 1913 (Hardcover) (679 pages). Description: From the introduction to the appendix, this volume is filled with interesting information. Covering seventeen counties—Alleghany, Ashe, Avery, Buncombe, Cherokee, Clay, Graham, Haywood, Henderson, Jackson, Macon, Madison, Mitchell, Swain, Transylvania, Watauga, and Yancey—the author conducted about ten years searching and gathering materials. Continued...

About the Author: John Preston Arthur was born in 1851 in Columbia, South Carolina. After relocating to Asheville, North Carolina, in 1887, he was appointed Secretary of the Street Railway Company, and subsequently the Manager and Superintendent until 1894. Later, after becoming a lawyer, he was encouraged by the Daughters of the American Revolution (D.A.R.) to write a history of western North Carolina.
 

Recommended Reading: Touring the Western North Carolina Backroads (Touring the Backroads). Editorial Review: This guidebook, unlike most, is so encyclopedic in scope that I give it as a gift to newcomers to the area. It is also an invaluable reference for the visitor who wants to see more than the fabulous Biltmore Estate. Even though I am a native of the area, I learned nearly everything I know about Western North Carolina from this book alone and it is my primary reference. I am still amazed at how much fact, history and folklore [just enough to bring alive the curve of the road, the odd landmark, the abandoned building] is packed in its 300 pages. The author, who must have collapsed from exhaustion when she finished it, takes you on a detailed tour, laid out by the tenth of the mile, of carefully drawn sections of backroads that you can follow leisurely without getting lost. Continued below...

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Recommended Reading: Touring the Carolina's Civil War Sites (Touring the Backroads Series). Description: Touring the Carolina's Civil War Sites helps travelers find the Carolinas' famous Civil War battlefields, forts, and memorials, as well as the lesser skirmish sites, homes, and towns that also played a significant role in the war. The book's 19 tours, which cover the 'entire Carolinas,' combine riveting history with clear, concise directions and maps, creating a book that is as fascinating to the armchair reader as it is to the person interested in heritage travel. Below are some examples from this outstanding book:

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I also enjoyed reading about the locations of various gravesites of Confederate generals and their Civil War service. Indeed, if not for this book, this native North Carolinian and long-time Civil War buff may never have learned of, and visited, the locations of some of the lesser-known sites other than those mentioned above.
Johnson's writing style is smooth--without being overly simplistic--and contains several anecdotes (some humorous ones too) of the interesting events which took place during the Civil War years. Highly recommended!

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